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dc.contributor.advisorBenade, Leon
dc.contributor.advisorJackson, Mark
dc.contributor.authorWells, Alastair William John
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-22T23:00:11Z
dc.date.available2018-11-22T23:00:11Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/12058
dc.description.abstractAs described in the New Zealand Curriculum, education was—and still is—in a period of one of its most significant innovations. Agents of educational change, both human and non-human, include teachers, students, architects, facilities, technologies, the institution of the MOE and its commissioning processes for educational design. These are all susceptible to the volatility of identity change, misalignment, inertia and resistance to innovation, as well as the potential for significantly new understandings of the site of learning. The situation as just described gave rise to this research question: Do Innovative Learning Environments (ILE) constitute an agency for teaching and learning? Subsequently a key aim of this thesis was to investigate a number of these agents of change, and this study focussed specifically on the context of the design and occupation of two innovative secondary schools in Auckland.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectEducationen_NZ
dc.subjectLearning environmentsen_NZ
dc.subjectPedagogyen_NZ
dc.subjectSpatial designen_NZ
dc.subjectSpatial ontologyen_NZ
dc.subjectEnvironmental agencyen_NZ
dc.titleInnovative Learning Environments as Agents of Changeen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.levelDoctoral Theses
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophyen_NZ
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.date.updated2018-11-22T22:25:35Z


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