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dc.contributor.authorStewart, Sen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorKeys, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBrenton-Rule, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorAiyer, Aen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorDalbeth, Nen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorRome, Ken_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-18T03:24:40Z
dc.date.available2018-07-18T03:24:40Z
dc.date.copyright2018-07-08en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationJournal of foot and ankle research, 11(1), 38.
dc.identifier.issn1757-1146en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/11736
dc.description.abstractBackground To determine characteristics of footwear worn by people with systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Twenty-two people with SLE and twenty matched healthy controls participated in a cross-sectional study. Objective assessments of footwear included: fit, style, structure, motion control, cushioning, and wear. Footwear was classified as poor, average or good based on a standardised tool. Participants completed 100mm visual analogue scales for foot pain and footwear comfort and suitability. Participants with SLE were asked to indicate which footwear features were important to them using a validated checklist. Results No differences were observed between groups for footwear fit, age, style, heel height, forefoot flexion or cushioning (all P>0.05). Compared to controls, a greater number of participants with SLE wore shoes with worn tread (65% vs. 91%, P=0.041), wore shoes with a lower motion control scale (median: 5.0 vs. 1.0, P=0.003), and rated their footwear as less comfortable (median: 90mm vs. 78mm, P=0.024) and less suitable (median: 88mm vs. 76mm, P=0.030). Participants with SLE experienced greater foot pain than controls (median: 17mm vs. 0mm, P=0.038). Comfort (95%), fit (95%) and style (86%) were identified as the most important footwear features by people with SLE. Conclusions Compared to control participants, people with SLE wear shoes that are more worn and lack motion control. They also report greater foot pain and report their shoes to be less comfortable and suitable. These findings highlight the need for a further focus on the role of footwear in the management of foot problems in people with SLE.
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://jfootankleres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13047-018-0280-3
dc.rights© The Author(s). 2018 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
dc.subjectSystematic lupus erythematosus; Footwear; Foot pain
dc.titleCharacteristics of footwear worn by people with systemic lupus erythematosus: A comparison with age- and sex-matched healthy controls: A pilot studyen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13047-018-0280-3
pubs.elements-id340868
aut.relation.journalJournal of Foot and Ankle Researchen_NZ


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