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dc.contributor.advisorMical, Thomas
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Michelle
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-11T23:50:51Z
dc.date.available2018-07-11T23:50:51Z
dc.date.copyright2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/11685
dc.description.abstractAmong the virtual communities and networks, we create, share and exchange information. For young adults, the excess of information has increasingly become a problem for their personal, behavioural, psychological and performance. Submerged within the use of technology, their patterns of consumption have influenced a shift in their productivity, well-being, work, decision-making and innovation. It is essential to understand the causes and consequences of information overload to address the issues within the research. This study investigates young adult’s general use of digital media to ultimately create and refine methods on how to declutter. A group consisting of the same six young adults conducted both a focus group and one-on-one interview. It is predicted that the heavy reliance on digital media usage will be difficult to reduce. The results indicate that the pressure from life stressors forces them to adapt to the demands of technology by altering their daily routines and relationships to fit and favour around technology.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectInformationen_NZ
dc.subjectDeclutteringen_NZ
dc.subjectInformation declutteringen_NZ
dc.subjectYoung adultsen_NZ
dc.subjectConnected ageen_NZ
dc.subjectInformation overloaden_NZ
dc.titleInformation decluttering in a connected age: How to educate young adultsen_NZ
dc.typeThesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Designen_NZ
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.date.updated2018-07-11T13:10:35Z


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