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dc.contributor.authorPonton, Ven_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2018-01-24T01:15:14Z
dc.date.available2018-01-24T01:15:14Z
dc.date.copyright2017-11-20en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Innovation and Research in Educational Sciences, Volume 4, Issue 6, pp. 716–718
dc.identifier.issn2349-5219en_NZ
dc.identifier.issn2349-5219en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/11136
dc.description.abstractMale and female Samoan tattooing has always signified one’s perseverance and ability to withstand the pain of undergoing the ritual, as well as signified one’s identity, readiness and capacity to be of service to one’s extended family. What will be explored is the way in which this ritual has been embodied as a demonstration of reclaiming values of traditional practices thereby minimizing absolute extinction. Ways in which the tattoo ritual has evolved and changed over time, will be explored using the cultural lens of the Fonofale and Teu le Va models. This paper highlights the proposed research interest in utilizing Pacific methodologies to plan and undertake study of questions posed for more detailed exploration.
dc.publisherTimeline Publication Pvt. Ltd.
dc.relation.urihttp://www.ijires.org/index.php/issues?view=publication&task=show&id=339en_NZ
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
dc.subjectPacific methodologies; Samoan tattoo practices; Historical and Contemporary analyses
dc.titleOur practices may change, but the values and foundations of the cultural traditions remainen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
aut.relation.endpage718
aut.relation.issue6en_NZ
aut.relation.startpage716
aut.relation.volume4en_NZ
pubs.elements-id322719
aut.relation.journalInternational Journal of Innovation and Research in Educational Sciencesen_NZ


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