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dc.date.accessioned2018-01-08T01:50:18Z
dc.date.available2018-01-08T01:50:18Z
dc.date.copyright2017-05-16en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Otolaryngology-ENT Research 7(3): 00202. DOI: 10.15406/joentr.2017.07.00202
dc.identifier.issn2379-6359en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/11056
dc.description.abstractNormal nasal airflow alternates in dominance between the two nostrils with an ultradian rhythm called the “nasal cycle.” The nasal cycle is thought to enable the patent airway to perform the majority of the air-conditioning functions, while the congested side undergoes a period of recovery. Nasal-applied continuous positive airway pressure (n-CPAP) forces air equally up both sides of the nose disrupting the nasal cycle, which could contribute to nasal side-effects, such as nasal dryness, crusting and congestion. The development of a n-CPAP machine, which approximates physiological alternating nasal airflow during sleep, could reduce nasal side effects and improve n-CPAP adherence. A n-CPAP mask would need modification so that air under pressure could be independently directed to and received from each side of the nose. The system would allow for the pre-setting of both the nasal cycle duration time and the degree of airflow partitioning between each naris. A n-CPAP machine that approximates the normal physiological nasal cycle during sleep could reduce the incidence of adverse nasal symptoms and improve sleep quality leading to improved n-CPAP compliance.
dc.publisherMedCrave
dc.relation.urihttp://medcraveonline.com/JOENTR/JOENTR-07-00202.pdfen_NZ
dc.rightsMedCrave is an Open Access which means that all content is freely available without charge to the user or his/her institution. Users are allowed to read, download, copy, distribute, print, search, or link to the full texts of the articles, or use them for any other lawful purpose, without asking prior permission from us or the author.
dc.subjectCPAP; Nasal cycle; Nasal airflow partitioning; Obstructive sleep apnoea
dc.titleThe Rationale Behind a Continous Nasal Positive Airway Pressure Machine That Approximates the Nasal Cycle During Sleepen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.15406/joentr.2017.07.00202en_NZ
dark.contributor.authorBartley, Jen_NZ
dark.contributor.authorWhite, DEen_NZ
aut.relation.endpage3
aut.relation.issue3en_NZ
aut.relation.pages3
aut.relation.startpage1
aut.relation.volume7en_NZ
pubs.elements-id280503
aut.relation.journalJournal of Otolaryngology-ENT Researchen_NZ


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