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dc.contributor.advisorHuang, Loulin
dc.contributor.authorYan, Han (Ashley)
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-12T03:00:03Z
dc.date.available2017-07-12T03:00:03Z
dc.date.copyright2017
dc.date.created2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/10656
dc.description.abstractWind power is the second largest renewable resource from which we can obtain electricity, besides hydropower. Wind farms have had significant growth in past decades; however, they require a massive investment to setup including heavy towers, large land scale, and huge blades. Meanwhile, due to Betz’s law, the maximum power that the wind turbine can harvest is only 59.3%. Therefore, surfing kites have been proposed as a promising alternative way to generate electricity. This project aims to build a suitable simulation platform to study the modelling and control of kites for power generation. In this thesis, different types of the kite and their controlling methods have been reviewed, and two line surf kites have been identified as the subjects for the study. By analysing and comparing Newtonian mechanics theory and Kane’ method, the dynamic model of a kite is established. The kite power generation cycle and retraction cycle is then explained according to the model. Glider mode from AeroSim simulation blockset in Simulink library provides a set of tools to develop this non-linear six degree of the freedom kite dynamic model. The simulation results demonstrate the power generation ability of a surf kite. Considering the input constraints, a linear control system is proposed and simulated to make the kite achieve a figure eight configuration needed for power generation. The Simulink toolbox has then been employed to simulate the linear control scheme to determine its stability and performance.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectSurfing kiteen_NZ
dc.subjectPoweren_NZ
dc.subjectGenerationen_NZ
dc.subjectControlen_NZ
dc.titleModelling and Control of Surfing Kites for Power Generationen_NZ
dc.typeThesis
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.levelMasters Theses
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Engineeringen_NZ
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.date.updated2017-07-12T02:55:35Z


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