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dc.contributor.advisorO'Connor, John
dc.contributor.authorFleming, Anna
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-01T23:18:20Z
dc.date.available2017-06-01T23:18:20Z
dc.date.copyright2016
dc.date.created2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/10510
dc.description.abstractWestern attachment theory has tended to focus on the interpersonal attachments between people; only relatively recently have western perspectives begun to explore the quality of attachments outside of the interpersonal domain. By contrast, Indigenous Māori attachment perspectives have always included vital connections to cultural and collective concepts such as whānau, whenua, and wairua. This critical literature review utilises Kaupapa Māori Research Theory to explore similarities and differences between indigenous Māori and western concepts of attachment, while also examining the implications for psychotherapy in Aotearoa New Zealand.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technology
dc.subjectAttachmenten_NZ
dc.subjectIndigenousen_NZ
dc.subjectKaupapa Māori Research Theoryen_NZ
dc.subjectMāorien_NZ
dc.subjectPsychotherapyen_NZ
dc.titleNgā Tāpiritanga: In What Ways Are Indigenous Māori Perspectives on Attachment Similar to and Different From Western Psychoanalytic Perspectives on Attachment and What Are the Implications for the Practice of Psychotherapy in Aotearoa New Zealand? A Kaupapa Māori Critical Literature Reviewen_NZ
dc.typeDissertation
thesis.degree.grantorAuckland University of Technology
thesis.degree.levelMasters Dissertations
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Psychotherapyen_NZ
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccess
dc.date.updated2017-06-01T08:20:35Z


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