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dc.contributor.authorCarroll, Men_NZ
dc.contributor.authorJepson, Hen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorMolyneux, Pen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorBrenton-Rule, Aen_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-10T02:16:24Z
dc.date.available2020-11-10T02:16:24Z
dc.date.copyright2020en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Foot and Ankle Research, 13(1), 1-7.
dc.identifier.issn1757-1146en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/13773
dc.description.abstractBackground This is the first study to explore workforce data from the Podiatrists Board of New Zealand. The study analysed data from an online survey which New Zealand podiatrists complete as part of their application for an Annual Practising Certificate. Methods Survey responses between 2015 and 2019 were analysed. Data was related to work setting, employment status, work hours, location, professional affiliations, and number of graduates entering practice. Survey data was downloaded by a second party who provide data security for the Podiatrists Board of New Zealand workforce data. All data supplied for analysis were deidentified and could not be re-linked to an individual practitioner. Results In 2019 there were 430 podiatrists who held an Annual Practising Certificate. Eighty percent of podiatrists who work in New Zealand are in private practice, with 8% employed in the public health sector. Podiatrist’s work is a mix of general podiatry, diabetes care and sports medicine. The majority are self-employed (40%) or business owners (19%). Approximately 40% work between 31 to 40 h per week and 46 to 50 weeks per year. The majority are female (67%) with most practising in the North Island (69%) and located in the Auckland region (33%). On average 76% of new graduates were issued an Annual Practising Certificate between 2015 and 2019. Conclusion The New Zealand podiatry profession is small and growing at a slow rate, consequently there is evidence of a workforce shortage. To maintain a per-capita ratio of podiatrists approximate to Australia and the United Kingdom an additional 578 podiatrists are required in the New Zealand workforce. There are not enough new graduate practitioners entering the workforce and once practising, the majority enter private practice in the face of limited public health employment opportunities.en_NZ
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://jfootankleres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13047-020-00430-y
dc.rights© The Author(s). 2020 Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
dc.subjectNew Zealand; Podiatry; Workforce
dc.titleThe New Zealand Podiatry Profession – a Workforce in Crisis?en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13047-020-00430-yen_NZ
aut.relation.articlenumber62en_NZ
aut.relation.volume13en_NZ
pubs.elements-id391650
aut.relation.journalJournal of Foot and Ankle Researchen_NZ


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