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dc.contributor.authorKing, Den_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHume, Pen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorCummins, Cen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorClark, Ten_NZ
dc.contributor.authorGissane, Cen_NZ
dc.contributor.authorHecimovich, Men_NZ
dc.date.accessioned2019-06-21T03:37:21Z
dc.date.available2019-06-21T03:37:21Z
dc.date.copyright2019en_NZ
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Sports Medicine and Therapy. 2019; 4: 024-037. DOI: 10.29328/journal.jsmt.1001039
dc.identifier.issn2573-1726en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10292/12581
dc.description.abstractBackground: Epidemiological studies report that females experience greater rates of concussion when compared with males. Biomechanical factors may result in greater post-impact head velocities and accelerations for a given force for females when compared with males. Purpose: To quantify the magnitude, frequency, duration and distribution of impacts to the head and body in rugby league match activities for females versus males. Design: Prospective descriptive epidemiological study. Methods: 21 female and 35 male amateur rugby league players wore wireless impact measuring devices (X2Biosystems; xPatch) behind their right ear over the mastoid process during match participation across a single season. All impact data were collected and downloaded for further analysis. Results: Male amateur rugby league players experienced more head impacts than female amateur rugby league players (470 ±208 vs. 184 ±18; t(12)=-3.7; p=0.0028; d=1.94) per-match over the duration of the study. Male amateur rugby league players recorded a higher median resultant Peak Linear Acceleration (PLA(g)) (15.4 vs. 14.6 g; F(824,834)=51.6; p<0.0001; t(1658)=-3.3; p=0.0012; d=0.10) but a lower median resultant Peak Rotational Acceleration (PRA(rad/s2) (2,802.3 vs. 2,886.3 rad/s2; F(831,827)=3.1; p<0.0001; t(1658)=5.7; p<0.0001; d=0.13) when compared with female amateur rugby league players Conclusion: Females recorded lower median values for PLA(g) and Head Impact Telemetry severity profile (HITSP) for all positional groups but had a higher PRA(rad/s2) for Hit-up Forwards (HUF) and Outside Backs (OSB’s) when compared with male HUF and OSB’s. Females also recorded more impacts to the side of the head (48% vs. 42%) and had a higher 95th percentile resultant PRA(rad/s2) (12,015 vs. 9,523 rad/s2) to the top of the head when compared with male rugby league players.
dc.publisherHeighten Science
dc.relation.urihttps://www.heighpubs.org/jsmt/jsmt-aid1039.php
dc.rights© 2019 King DA, et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
dc.subjectHead impact biomechanics; Female athletes; Rugby league; xPatch
dc.titleHead Impact Exposure Comparison Between Male and Female Amateur Rugby League Participants Measured With an Instrumented Patchen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Article
dc.rights.accessrightsOpenAccessen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.29328/journal.jsmt.1001039
aut.relation.endpage037
aut.relation.startpage024
aut.relation.volume4en_NZ
pubs.elements-id359573
aut.relation.journalJournal of Sports Medicine and Therapyen_NZ


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